Bacteria breaking free from home

If you followed this blog for a while now, you are probably fully aware that bacteria are basically everywhere. Apart from that lake in Ethiopia, in which only recently scientists did not detect any form of life – a fact, which for me is still hard to digest. Anyway, when bacteria grow in the environment for example on water systems or pipelines, their metabolic activity can lead to degradation of the metal and to corrosion of the material. This can seriously effect functioning of the pipes which can then also result in serious health issues. One bacterium that likes to … Continue reading Bacteria breaking free from home

The bacterial armoury

In many of my previous posts I talked about how bacteria fight each other using one of their many killing devices (for example here or here). I also described a few strategies of how bacteria deliver toxins into competing bacteria (like here or here). And I always say that these toxins are the ones that finally kill the prey bacterium. So the questions I want to answer this week are: what does this toxin do once it reached the prey bacterium? How does a toxin kill a bacterium? And why is the toxin-producing bacterium not killed by the toxin? Please … Continue reading The bacterial armoury

Should I kill or should I go? Bacteria making decisions

Remember my favourite bacterial killing machine? You probably know the weapon called type 6 secretion system by now from my previous articles Bacteria killing each other, Bacteria firing powerful spikes and Bacteria firing powerful spikes with hats. But having this … Continue reading Should I kill or should I go? Bacteria making decisions

Bacteria firing powerful spikes

This week we will talk about one of my favourite bacterial devices. It is the bacterial killing machine, the type 6 secretion system, that I explained in detail in my very first post Bacteria killing each other. If you don’t remember well what is was, it is worth going back to refresh your memory, as we’re now looking closer into this fascinating nanomachine. This post is based on a journal article which was just published and which I would like to share with you here. It was also the longest and most tedious chapter of my thesis, so I have … Continue reading Bacteria firing powerful spikes

Tiny Biological Needles: How Some Bacteria Are Able to Infect Their Targets

Hi there! My name is Danny Ward and I am a PhD student at the John Innes Centre and the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. Today, I’m going to be telling you a little about what research I am working on, any why it is important. As the title suggests, I work on tiny biological needles. Tiny biological needles? Yes, you did indeed read that correctly! For many, we know that certain bacteria can cause disease but exactly how they are able to infect their targets often remains a mystery. One such system, responsible for promoting bacterial infection, … Continue reading Tiny Biological Needles: How Some Bacteria Are Able to Infect Their Targets